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On January 24th, Twitter released Vine, a new social video app. Essentially, it’s the Instagram of video [and, since Instagram and Twitter’s recent squabble, I both hope and assume that Twitter is gloating].

While it’s only been out a few short weeks, people are already freaking out about Vine. Photos capture moments, but video captures stories. And, with Vine, users can tell their own, unique, six second story and share it with the world.

It’s easy to use, it’s mobile, and it’s positively addictive.

Much like the launch of Instagram, Vine was an immediate hit. Will it reach the same 90+ million users? Who knows. But, just a few weeks after its launch, Vine has been adopted by everyone from celebrities to your father. And, perhaps the most surprising, is how quickly brands have gotten behind the app.

Brands have risen to the 6 second challenge. Mashable has made amazing stop-motion shorts, General Electric used it to create a quick and engaging cup game, the Brooklyn Nets used it to amp up their fans and Fashion Week used it to share the glitz and glam worldwide.

We like Vine because it is short, sweet and simple. Much like Twitter, Vine forces brevity.  You only have six seconds, so there’s no use over complicating or over thinking the video you want to make. Have a story to tell, and tell it concisely. Spend your 6 seconds wisely. Drive your message and serve your business’ goal.

However, while Vine is cool and easy to use, we at SolidLine want to stress that it should be used intelligently and economically. Yes, we are a video production company, so we’re a little biased. We’re going to tell you that a 6 second Vine video isn’t a substitute for a strategic brand video, but we shouldn’t have to. Vine is cool, but it’s also just another content creating tool. It’s not about quantity, it’s about quality. Add Vine to your toolbox, don’t depend on it, and don’t saturate your social media presence with 6 second videos.

We, at SolidLine, can’t stress the engagement potential and shareability of video as a media. So, go ahead and Vine. Make a splash, let your audience in, but be smart about it. Vine isn’t exactly a comprehensive social or promotional strategy and excess in any form is off-putting to consumers…and also obnoxious.